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Daily fantasy sports sites offer turbo-charged fast-cash contests designed around a simple concept: Players pay an entry fee between 25 cents and $5,000, build an imaginary team of real-life players and then compete with others over how well their chosen athletes performed in a day on the field.

The games, which are legal in all but five states, have survived with help from a federal law passed in 2006 that cracked down on online gambling but carved out an exception for fantasy sports, then known mostly for their slower, season-based gameplay popular in workplace leagues.

Industry boosters, including Fandom Cup, defend the games as a game of skill, not chance. Fandom Cup chief executive Rob Meinert, who has produced and posted a video which contrasts DFS with blackjack, often states “would a casino allow me to use my own pre-stacked deck of cards for blackjack?.”

 

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